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BUILDING INTEGRATION

Posts Tagged ‘Energy Usage’

10 energy-saving tips for dark, cold months

The recent arrival of cooler temps dovetailed with the end of Daylight Savings Time, making it feel like the world suddenly went dark and cold and the same time. Is your business or organization still making the adjustment?

These tips will help you maximize energy efficiency during the winter months:

Contact your energy provider and ask if they will help you conduct an energy audit. Many providers provide free audits to customers.

Review your energy usage from last winter season and set targets. How much energy did you use? What was the average daily temp and other conditions? Setting a goal for reducing use might help you keep costs in check.

Check insulation. Make sure it is adequate to meet your needs. Check seals on all duct work to make sure it is sound and air isn’t leaking.

Schedule regular maintenance for your HVAC system to keep it running at peak efficiency. Be sure to change or clean filters, too. Dirty filters make systems worker harder and less efficiently.

Check all vents and returns to make sure they are clear of obstructions. Arrange furniture so air flow is maximized, and keep paper and other debris clear.
Look for leaky doors and windows and seal them. Use caulk and/or weather stripping to seal up energy-sucking gaps throughout your facility. Gaps around plumbing access, electrical outlets and lighting fixtures are often leaky, too. Seal them up and you’ll better maintain temps in your facility.

Use programmable thermostats to maintain temps. Set temps no higher than 67 degrees when your facility is occupied, and drop temps several degrees overnight or when facilities are not in use. You’ll realize substantial savings by dropping your thermostat just two degrees.

Limit the use of space heaters. Not only do they present a fire hazard, they use significant energy and make it difficult to regulate temperatures. Encourage layering clothes or wearing sweaters for personal comfort.

Maximize use of natural light. Open blinds and curtains to allow sunshine in during the day, and close them at night to retain heat.

Monitor lighting use. Use sensors or timers to turn lights on and off automatically. Switch to LED lighting wherever possible. Use smart power strips and sleep settings to operate office equipment efficiently.

Need help monitoring and integrating your HVAC and other key building systems? We can help. Call (502) 632-4322 to learn more.

Companies move ahead with ‘green’ policies, with or without government support

President Trump has proposed steep cuts to the budgets of agencies charged with protecting the environment, and has pledged to roll back regulations that he sees as barriers to business growth.

Proposals include  cutting the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget by one third, and significantly reducing staff. The cuts would deeply impact enforcement at both the state and federal level, and would end the Energy Star rating program.

President Trump also withdrew the United States from the Paris Accord, an agreement between dozens of countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in an effort to slow or reverse climate change.

How have businesses responded to the proposals and changes? Rather than cheering loudly, many have pledged to continue their environmentally-friendly efforts, according to a recent post by Energy Manager Today.

According to the post, “REI, Kohls and Netflix currently source 100% of their electricity usage through renewable energy, while Google recently announced it will meet its 100% renewable energy goal this year.”

Goldman Sachs, which is anticipating a surge in renewable energy growth in Europe, recently signed an agreement to purchase power from a wind farm in Pennsylvania.

Apple also plans to build a data center in Denmark run completely on renewable energy, according to the post.

Why do businesses remain committed to renewable energy and other environmentally conscious practices, even if government regulations relax and incentives evaporate? Here are two reasons:

Consumers are watching. Consumers are typically favorable towards environmentally-friendly practices, and many actively seek out companies which share their commitment. Companies benefit when their brand is seen as “green,” both in terms of brand perception and competitive advantage.

Long-term cost efficiencies. Over the long-term, energy saving and renewable energy options actually turn out to be less expensive to operate and maintain than less green, traditional options. Business save money by optimizing lighting systems, adding smart sensors and more.

Integrated systems play a significant role in energy efficiency. Interested in learning more about integrated systems? We can help. Call (502) 632-4322 to talk to us about your needs.

13 summer energy saving tips

The dog days of summer have arrived, and with them peak energy use. Air conditioners are pumping at full blast, and energy managers are dreading next month’s power bill.

What can businesses do to conserve power and control costs? Here are a few simple tips:

 

  • Set the thermostat to 78 degrees while facilities are in use, and 80 or above when not in use.
  • Check all air filters and change as necessary. Service units regularly to make sure they are running at peak efficiency.
  • Install programmable thermostats to automatically adjust according to your desired settings.
  • Replace older equipment with newer, more energy-efficient models.
  • Check in with LG & E about possible rebates for new energy-efficient equipment. LG & E also offers a demand conservation program which may provide your business with modest monthly savings.
  • If you use an outside vendor to providing vending machines in your facility’s break room, check with them to see if the machines are Energy Star machines. If they are not, negotiate for an upgrade.
  • Replace all incandescent light bulbs with more energy efficient CFL or LED bulbs.
  • Don’t forget outside lights. Put outside lights on timers or sensors, or make sure they are shut off during daylight hours.
  • Install motion sensors that automatically turn off lights when rooms are unoccupied.
  • Keep window shades/blinds drawn to block heat, or install screens or film to reflect bright sunlight.
  • Turn off and/or unplug equipment when not in use.
  • Consider flexible work arrangements where appropriate. If employees duties don’t require them to physically be in your office, why not have them work from home? Fewer workers in the office means less demand for lighting, cooling and power.
  • Maximize your landscaping to shade and shelter your building. An ocean of asphalt is not the most energy-efficient setting. A few well-placed trees can block the sun’s rays from heating up your facility.

Could facility improvements help improve student performance?

Maintaining school facilities is a challenge in nearly every school district. Most districts don’t have the funds to adequately resource regular capital improvements, and maintenance is sometimes deferred and systems and equipment are repaired long after they should have been replaced.


It’s no different for Jefferson County Public Schools, which has 155 school buildings, shifting population and a $1.3 billion list of maintenance and new construction projects.
Addressing the maintenance and construction issues is a complex challenge, but the payoffs are considerable, including improved energy efficiency and better utilization of resources, among other things.
But the most important payback of all might be improved student performance. How?
According to the Environmental Protection Agency, schools without a major maintenance backlog have a higher average daily attendance of 4 to 5 students per 1,000 and a lower annual dropout rate by 10 to 13 students per 1,000 compared to schools with backlogs.
Check out these other benefits and impacts the EPA cites:

  • Studies that measure school conditions consistently show improved scores on standardized tests as school conditions improve.
  • Controlled studies show that children perform school work with greater speed as air ventilation rates increase, and performance of teachers and staff also improves.
  • Higher ventilation rates have been shown to reduce the transmission of infectious agents in the building, which leads to a drop in sickness and absenteeism.
  • Moderate changes in room temperature affect children’s abilities to perform mental tasks requiring concentration, such as addition, multiplication and sentence comprehension. Poor temperature and humidity regulation can lead to problems with focus.

Well-maintained systems are key to building maintenance, and important for the development, health and safety of students and staff.
We’re always happy to discuss how our solutions can help. Connect with us at the Kentucky School Plant Management Association conference and workshops Oct. 18-19 at the Embassy Suites Hotel at 1801 Newtown Pike in Lexington or call us at (502) 632-4322 to discuss your needs.

5 tips to get your facility ready for fall

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Even with record-setting high temps dogging us well into November, fall and winter weather are bound to arrive in the Ohio Valley sometime soon. Is your facility ready?

Here’s how you can prepare:

 

Check your lighting. Even if it never cools off, the sun is setting earlier each day, and the time will change on Nov. 6. That “fall back” will cost us an hour of daylight in the evening. Be sure to adjust timers which automatically turn lights on and off.
Reassess security systems. Changes in daylight may also mean changes to safety and security threats. Will customers or staff members be entering or exiting your building when it is dark? Now is the time to walk through and around facilities and note any new or shifting risks.
Service your HVAC system. Clean and/or replace filters, and clean out duct work to reduce allergens and ensure peak efficiency. Have your entire heating system inspected by a qualified professional.
Check windows and doors. Inspect all windows and doors to make sure they are operating properly and the seals are tight.
Start coordinating holiday travel schedules. With the holidays approaching, key staff members may plan to take time off or travel. Don’t wait until the last minute to hand off duties, login information, vendor contacts and other key details. For more, check out our earlier post outlining key steps for planning around vacations.

Drones, wearable tech bring fresh focus to building maintenance

By taking human eyes where it’s difficult for human bodies to go, tech gadgets are taking building maintenance to the next level.

Image: Lino Schmid & Moira Prati

Image: Lino Schmid & Moira Prati

Drones and smart glasses are two of the latest tech gadgets being deployed in new ways to help experts gather information and solve problems.

A story posted by Energy Manager Today highlights several cases where drones are being used to quickly and safely inspect facilities, something that’s often difficult or even impossible.

“A drone can inspect assets that are dangerous and/or difficult to reach — or completely inaccessible to humans. The fact that they are airborne avoids time-consuming preparations, such as building scaffolding to inspect walls. For energy managers, these devices can be used to conduct higher perspective inspections of rooftop assets or even the inside of equipment that have large cavities,” according to the author of the post.

Duke Energy and ConEnergy are both using drones to inspect boilers. Duke has also used drones to check solar panels and assess storm damage. Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance uses drones to scan building roofs for leaks.

While drones are the eyes in the sky for some facility managers, others are turning to smart glasses to focus on solving problems.

An HVAC contractor in Tennessee is using smart glasses to connect technicians, expert support and customers. Lee Company technicians use smart glasses to transmit video feeds to customers and in-office support, improving communication and reducing the need to send additional personnel out to solve problems. The company credits the smart glasses with improving efficiency and customer satisfaction, as well as helping them overcome a labor shortage and attracting new talent.

Survey reveals improvements in energy efficiency

Good news on the energy efficiency front: even while the square footage of commercial buildings is on the rise, energy consumption is growing at a much slower rate.

Those are part of the findings from the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey released earlier this year. The research revealed that floorspace has increased 22 percent since 2003, and the total number of buildings has increased 14 percent, but energy use has increased just seven percent.

The average total energy used per square foot of commercial buildings showed a statistically significant decrease, from 91.0 thousand Btu per square foot to 80.0 thousand Btu per square foot.

What’s behind the slowdown in energy consumption? Authors of the study point to new building construction standards for energy efficiency, changes in building usage and construction in more temperate areas. Improvements in the energy efficiency of equipment are also lowering energy use.

Energy consumption for lighting and heating both dropped by 11 percent, according to the study.

Electricity usage steady despite increased use of electricity dependent equipment, while the natural gas consumption decreased due to improved efficiency standards and warmer winters.

The total amount of energy used for lighting has decreased 46 percent due to the increasing use of compact fluorescent and LED bulbs as replacements for lower efficiency incandescent bulbs. The trend is expected to continue. LEDs currently account for 15 percent of U.S. lightbulb sales, and are expected to account for half of all sales by 2020.

The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey is a national sample survey conducted by the U.S. Energy Information Adminstration that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, including their energy-related building characteristics and energy usage. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979; the latest was fielded starting in April 2013 to provide data for calendar year 2012.

Planning for Power Outages.

16634643 - the words no power in red letters in front of an electrical outlet and an unplugged cord to symbolize an electricity outage or energy failure

The occasional power outage is typically a mild inconvenience, but it can become a significant risk to people, equipment and supplies. Planning ahead will help you reduce risks. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Identify critical systems that require power such as lighting, HVAC, air ventilation, refrigeration, computers, elevators, alarms and monitoring systems.  Know where and how to shut off power to each system and piece of equipment.

Turn off power to equipment, appliances and systems to prevent damage from surges when the power is restored. Consider installing surge protection system.

Identify critical systems which must remain in operation. Consider renting or purchasing a backup generator to run those critical systems during an outage.

List suppliers and customers that may need to be alerted in the event of a power outage.

Install emergency lighting in key areas, and test regularly to make sure it’s in good working order in the event of an emergency.

Plan and post evacuation routes. This is especially critical if you are in a high-rise building dependent on elevators. Be sure to include plans for how disabled staff and guests who may have difficulty managing stairs will be evacuated.

Consider alternative communication options for employees, such as group text or private social media chat. Keep a phone on hand that does not require power, and keep all mobile devices charged and ready for use.

Designate off-site meeting locations for key staff members.

Document power failure procedures and other critical information, and include it with your other emergency plan documentation.

Proposed ordinance could make green improvements more attractive for business owners

If you’ve been putting off energy and conservation improvements because of cost, the Louisville Metro Government may be on the verge of putting those improvements within reach, according to a recent story in the Louisville Courier-Journal.

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Metro Government is considering a proposal which would enable owners of commercial, industrial and larger multi-unit residential buildings to make energy efficient upgrades to their buildings and pay for them through tax assessments. The ordinance was proposed by Bill Hollander, D-9th District.

Such improvements as HVAC upgrades, chillers, boilers, and furnaces, water heating systems, energy management systems and controls, mechanical system modernizations, lighting upgrades, and solar, wind turbines and geothermal heating and cooling, as well as water efficiency measures such as water management systems and controls would be qualified under the measure.

The ordinance requires no taxpayer dollars. It would create an Energy Project Assessment District, or EPAD, allowing property owners to acquire private financing to make their improvements and then repay the loans via an assessment collected by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s office over a term of up to 20 years, according to the story. The loan attaches to the property rather than the borrower, and transfer upon sale of the property.

The proposed ordinance was assigned to the Labor and Economic Development Committee at the Metro Council’s meeting on April 14, and was placed on the agenda for the committee’s April 19 meeting. Members of the committee include Chair Person Cheri Bryant Hamilton (D-5), Vice Chair Stuart Benson (R-20), Pat Mulvihill (D-10), Marianne Butler (D-15) and Robin Engel (R-22).

According to the Kentucky Conservation Committee, thirty other states have already passed legislation enabling the creation of EPAD. Several cities in Kentucky have created EPADs, and one project in Northern Kentucky has been funded.

Check out more facts about EPAD here.

The Future is Bright for LED

7491969_sWhat type of light bulb does your facility favor? If it’s LED, the future is bright.

General Electric announced on Feb. 1 that it will cease manufacturing compact fluorescent light bulbs in favor of light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are growing in popularity, according to Bloomberg news.

LEDs currently account for 15 percent of U.S. lightbulb sales, and are expected to account for half of all sales by 2020, according to the report. Prices for LED lights have declined, while the ability to integrate them into smart systems has added to their appeal.

Just days after the announcement that they were getting out of the CFL business, GE had a much bigger announcement to make. Current, a GE subsidiary, inked a deal with JPMorgan Chase & Co. to install LED lighting across most of Chase’s U.S. branches, making it the world’s largest single-order LED installation to date. The deal may include as much as 25 million square feet across roughly 5,000 branches.

According to Seeking Alpha, Current estimates the project could reduce the branches’ lighting-related energy use by more than 50 percent, the equivalent of taking nearly 27,000 cars off the road.

The impetus driving the move to LEDs is the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) signed into law in 2007. The second phase of the Act mandates an increase the efficiency of LEDs and other types of lighting devices. Developers and managers of multi-unit dwelling units, and universities are likely to be most impacted by the regulations, according to a recent post in Energy Manager Today.